Weekend Daylight

Just after Thanksgiving, we had a massive downpour. The little creek behind my house usually runs a little trickle or less, fills quickly with any rain, and recedes again quickly. So, when the rain paused for a moment, I went out and took some pictures and video of it running high and quick, just for fun.

Then, I went inside to do some work for awhile just as the skies opened back up. Out of curiosity, after about half an hour, I opened a second-floor window to see how the creek was doing (there is a privacy covering on that window). That’s how fast a creek or a river can jump its banks. (Additional note: flood waters always flow fast. Always be careful.) I kept an eye on it the rest of the day.

Just like the rest of the backyard, I have plans for that little creek. Replacing the footbridge with one that arches higher above the creek is one plan. (It is submerged in the photos.) Removing a sapling growing in the middle of it is another. I want to do some studying on habitat-friendly creek maintenance, so if you have recommendations for resources, let me know in the comments. This is going to be a long slow project that will never really end.

Today, I braved the backyard again so that I could go pull up more English ivy along the row of black inkberries. After spending the entire month of November dealing with weeping skin from poison ivy contact and then finally learning that I am allergic to prednisone (this was my first time being prescribed prednisone), I set up a primary decontamination “warm zone” every time I prepare to go out there. The water spigot is just out of picture frame. Then, afterwards, I count the days, waiting to see if I am safe. Eventually, I will eradicate all of the offending plant. I hope.

Brick wall and window with items arranged on window sill: soap, scrub brush, spray bottle, and pink hand towel.

I also cleared out one haul’s worth of leaves from the creek and took them up to two of the inkberries. I will catch the other eight another day.

Small green bush with pin oak leaves mulching the ground around it. A lot of English ivy growing to the left of the bush.

Note neighbor’s English ivy to the left. I have been working hard to the right (and only have a small swath to show for it, so far.)

And, I started pulling English ivy away from this old rusted clothesline pole that is such an eyesore (especially in winter) and that I hate. I figure that is the first step in preparing to dig the concrete footing out. It did cross my mind that there are people out there who shoot up power substations . . . but if I am desperate for a clothesline, I will just string it between trees.

Lower half of rusted metal pole rising out of a matted sea of English ivy with a very small area cleared around the base of the pole.

Wish me luck. I have a feeling this is going to be a beast. And, there’s another one.

The long hours of darkness long into the morning and returning early in the evening, resulting in the only daylight existing while I am sitting in an office, are hard on me during the week. I want to be outside and work in the yard and am thrilled for any weekend day that does not rain.

Mastodon Migrations and Identity

A friend of mine mentioned Mastodon. Actually, he had mentioned it in the past, but I was happy where I was, which was Twitter. I had curated a great Twitter feed.

But, I am a strong believer that people/groups we allow to have influence over our thoughts and feelings, even seemingly tangentially (which is never as tangentially as they would have you believe) is an important consideration. So, I had already decided it was time to leave Twitter completely, with a clean break, when my friend mentioned Mastodon again.

I looked. I was impressed. There is a lot being written about Mastodon lately and I am not a tech expert, social groups expert, or Mastodon expert, so my little beginner list here is very inadequate in every way. But, the things I like, so far, are:

  • No ads or sponsored posts.
  • No data mining.
  • Mastodon is kind of anarchist in nature (and I am not an anarchy expert either, so, no offense for misconstruing this). A bunch of independent random people host “servers” (in English, seems to be “instances” in other languages). You could host your own server. They make their own rules about moderating, post character lengths, etc. That is your “home” group. But, you can simultaneously have a “federated” view and see posts or “toots” from other servers/instances. Don’t like your current “home”? Migrate to a new one. They have made it very simple to do.
  • As an outgrowth of the above, experienced users tend to use content notices much more liberally and encourage us new users to do so too. And, they do it better than Twitter. You put the subject and then there is a button to click for “Show more.” So simple and elegant.
  • There is an edit function.
  • It seems to be a more international platform, likely because it was started, I think, in Germany. You can choose servers based on primary language. My first “starter” server was in English. My current server is German, but it said English posts were fine, there are a lot of English posts, and it gives me a chance to practice perusing in German and if I want to make sure I am getting it, I just ask for help from Google Translate (which is far from perfect, but it is fun to use as an additional help). In other words, I like the international character in general and it is specifically allowing me regular fun exposure to one of my target languages without being burdensome or frustrating. It is serendipitously? intentionally? ideal, actually. The federated feed has quite a few languages making appearances.
  • Following hashtags is a designed-in function. You could do that on Twitter, but it was clearly an afterthought.
Four column layout for Mastodon with medic (white lab coat and stethoscope) happy yellow Mastodon in lower left corner. Far right column shows example of content notice.

Sorry for the resolution – I just don’t currently have the skills to fix that. Shows the four column advance web interface (selected in “Preferences”) showing 1. Where I can post or search, 2. My “home” or “server/instance” feed, 3. Notices, and 4. Federated feed* or with arrow to example of a content notice.

So, my very short experience has been this: There has been a huge flood of new accounts. There were a few servers that were open and accepting new accounts. Other accounts had temporarily put holds on new accounts because of the flood (and these are just regular individuals hosting the servers, for fun, I guess). Most other servers, you “apply” to join (sort of like joining a Facebook group or something). I joined one of these open servers that were accepting the flood of new users and got my feet wet.

There was nothing wrong with my server. It was run very well, actually. But, then I wanted to see what it was to join a specific community. I found this list. (I have no idea if it is exhaustive. I doubt it.) And, actually, this database looks like it has a pretty good search function.

And then came the question: Who am I? Who do I want to be? What do I want my downtime to naturally focus on?

There was a geographic option that fit me, which would have great advantages. But, I have never seen myself as mainly an experience of where I live. More importantly, I did not want even subtle limitations of my feed based on my current location. So, I looked at other options and actually did some significant reflection. My job? I love my job. It is meeting my needs beautifully at the moment. Great people. Great mission. But, I am not my job and, as perfect as it is, it is not my passion. My social concerns/activism? Honestly, I need a break from that sometimes because it is so emotionally taxing. I will be able to find it whenever I want through hashtags, etc, but I don’t want to be immersed in it when I need to relax. I do need time to relax. We all do. There are topics I am interested in that did not seem to have a server, yet. I ended up on one of my lifelong passions. Emergency medical care has never left me. It has been a part of me my entire life. It brings me joy. So, even though it is a small server, I ended up on medic.cafe. Plus, it has a cute mastodon medic. 🙂 I am

@Jayne@medic.cafe

One thing I have noticed is that my little niche interests, of which I had a great group and lots of activity on Twitter, have not really made it over to Mastodon, yet. I have high hopes.

So, check things out on Mastodon if you are wanting to make a social media move. Give me a follow so I can see you are there – I am rebuilding my feeds from scratch! Especially if you are interested in:

  • emergency medical services
  • building mutual aid systems and strong communities (found some on Mastodon)
  • religion (all walks, traditions, faiths, types)
  • native plants/permaculture
  • backpacking/hiking/camping/trail running (found some on Mastodon)

One last quick note on consciously and intentionally choosing our identity and how social media influences our outlook on life: I am so grateful to have the freedom to just drop Twitter and pick up Mastodon on my own terms. In my previous job, it was important for me to maintain various social media accounts for our organization. We were very active in social justice and nonviolence. I loved our mission and loved working there. I also love being able to put that on the back burner at will when needed. If I were to give advice to any young person it would be to not be a social media manager, either as a part of or as an entire role, professionally.

*(The federated feed is not to be confused with the Fediverse, which I did, originally. Here is an explainer of the Fediverse. It’s in German, but you should be able to click to have it appear in English.)

* * * * *

Now, for a quick update on my life: Last weekend, I planted 10 inkberry bushes, three elderberries, and two persimmon trees. And, I ended up with poison ivy reaction (despite my carefulness) so bad that I am now on a long taper of prednisone. I think I am also developing secondary cellulitis on my arm. I will mark the perimeter with a Sharpie at work tomorrow. My plan is to do no more fall planting and just focus on keeping these new plants and the two previously planted paw paws alive and, hopefully, root thriving. Given that I will need to water them regularly and thus brave any lurking poison ivy, this will be enough in itself.

Week 44 photos

White Cat in yard waste sack

I heard some rustling and looked over to see White Cat in the sack I had brought along for English ivy yard waste.

Green leaves with red berries with little white petal caps.

After getting nowhere in positively identifying this plant encroaching a beautiful old growth tree, I noticed the same plant where I work and was able to find out from experts there that it is wintercreep euonymus. Not native, invasive, and so I can relieve my tree of its encumbrance, despite its cute little additions of color. Someday.

Young maple with golden yellow leaves in front of magnolia tree.

This little maple brings me joy when I look out the window first thing in the morning.

Week 45

One small black inkberry berry on a branch with autumn leaf on ground below.

One of the ten inkberry bushes had one little black-ink berry on it already.

Paw paws when first planted and then one month later (from reverse viewpoint). I am hoping they are still healthy and this is just autumn changes in new transplants.

Small white mushroom in dirt just turned up for planting.

Childs toy of smiling person in red clothing with grey hair and glasses.

My daughter just sent me this photo from where she and 1-year-old A are nannying. A keeps calling this toy, “Grandma.” I love it.